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public school British education Britannica

Details: public school, also called independent school, in the United Kingdom, one of a relatively small group of institutions educating secondary-level students for a fee and independent of the state system as regards both endowment and administration.The term public school emerged in the 18th century when the reputation of certain grammar schools spread beyond their immediate environs.

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charter school education Britannica

Details: charter school, a publicly funded tuition-free school of choice that has greater autonomy than a traditional public school. In exchange for increased autonomy, charter schools are held accountable for improving student achievement and meeting other provisions of their charters. Charter schools are

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normal school teacher education Britannica

Details: normal school, institution for the training of teachers. One of the first schools so named, the École Normale Supérieure (“Normal Superior School”), was established in Paris in 1794. Based on various German exemplars, the school was intended to serve as a model for other teacher-training schools.

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common school American education Britannica

Details: Other articles where common school is discussed: coeducation: …new free public elementary, or common, schools, which after the American Revolution supplanted church institutions, were almost always coeducational, and by 1900 most public high schools were coeducational as well. Many private colleges from their inception admitted women (the first was Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio), and …

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Juilliard School History & Facts Britannica

Details: Juilliard School, internationally renowned school of the performing arts in New York, New York, U.S. It is now the professional educational arm of the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. The Juilliard School offers bachelor’s degrees in music, dance, and drama and postgraduate degrees in music.

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Gymnasium German school Britannica

Details: Gymnasium, in Germany, state-maintained secondary school that prepares pupils for higher academic education. This type of nine-year school originated in Strassburg in 1537. Although the usual leaving age is 19 or 20, a pupil may terminate his studies at the age of 16 and enter a vocational school.

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Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting Facts & …

Details: The Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting of December 14, 2012, left 28 people dead and 2 injured. After killing his mother in their home, Adam Lanza fatally shot 20 children and 6 adults at the school in Newtown, Connecticut, before taking his own life. It was one of the deadliest school shootings in U.S. history.

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education Definition, Development, History, Types

Details: Education, discipline that is concerned with methods of teaching and learning in schools or school-like environments as opposed to various nonformal and informal means of socialization (e.g., rural development projects and education through parent-child relationships).

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Stroganov school Christian art Britannica

Details: Stroganov school, school of icon painting that flourished in Russia in the late 16th and 17th centuries. The original patrons of this group of artists were the wealthy Stroganov family, colonizers in northeastern Russia; but the artists perfected their work in the service of the tsar and his family in Moscow.Representing the last vital stage of Russian medieval painting before the

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high school American education Britannica

Details: high school, in most school systems in the United States, any three- to six-year secondary school serving students approximately 13 (or 14 or 15) through 18 years of age.Often in four-year schools the different levels are designated, in ascending order, freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior. The most common form is the comprehensive high school that includes both general academic courses and

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Herāt school painting Britannica

Details: Herāt school, 15th-century style of miniature painting that flourished in Herāt, western Afghanistan, under the patronage of the Timurids. Shāh Rokh, the son of the Islāmic conqueror Timur (Tamerlane), founded the school, but it was his son Baysunqur Mīrzā (died 1433) who developed it into an

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school shooting Definition, Examples, Causal Factors

Details: school shooting. school shooting, in the typical case, an event in which a student at an educational institution—an elementary, middle, or high school or a college or university—shoots and injures or kills at least one other student or faculty member on the grounds of that institution. Such incidents usually involve multiple deaths.

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juku Japanese tutoring school Britannica

Details: juku, Japanese privately run, after-hours tutoring school geared to help elementary and secondary students perform better in their regular daytime schoolwork and to offer cram courses in preparation for university entry examinations. Juku (from gakushū juku, “tutoring school”) range from individual

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School of Alexandria institution, Alexandria, Egypt

Details: School of Alexandria, the first Christian institution of higher learning, founded in the mid-2nd century ad in Alexandria, Egypt.Under its earliest known leaders (Pantaenus, Clement, and Origen), it became a leading centre of the allegorical method of biblical interpretation, espoused a rapprochement between Greek culture and Christian faith, and attempted to assert orthodox Christian

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boarding school education Britannica

Details: Other articles where boarding school is discussed: Native American: Boarding schools: The worst offenses of the assimilationist movement occurred at government-sponsored boarding, or residential, schools. From the mid-19th century until as late as the 1960s, native families in Canada and the United States were compelled by law to send their children to these institutions,…

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Graded school education Britannica

Details: Graded school, also called grade school, an elementary or secondary school in which the instructional program is divided into school years, known as grades or forms.At the end of each academic year, pupils move from one grade to the next higher in a group, with only an occasional outstanding achiever allowed to “skip” a grade, or advance beyond his fellows to a still higher grade.

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École Normale Supérieure school, Paris, France Britannica

Details: In normal school. …first schools so named, the École Normale Supérieure (“Normal Superior School”), was established in Paris in 1794. Based on various German exemplars, the school was intended to serve as a model for other teacher-training schools. Later it became affiliated with the University of Paris.

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architecture Definition, Techniques, Types, Schools

Details: Architecture, the art and technique of designing and building, as distinguished from the skills associated with construction. The practice of architecture is employed to fulfill both practical and expressive requirements, and thus it serves both utilitarian and aesthetic ends.

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Shīrāz school Persian painting Britannica

Details: Shīrāz school, in Persian miniature painting, styles of a group of artists centered at Shīrāz, in southwestern Iran near the ancient city of Persepolis. The school, founded by the Mongol Il-Khans (1256–1353) in mid-14th century, was active through the beginning of the 16th century. It developed

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madrasah School, Education, History, & Facts Britannica

Details: Madrasah, institution of higher education in the Islamic sciences. These institutions functioned until the 20th century as theological seminaries and law schools, with a curriculum centered on the Qurʾan and the Hadith. Lecturers provided students with certificates that constituted permission to repeat their words.

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Avignon school painting Britannica

Details: The most prominent 15th-century artists of the Avignon school were Enguerrand Charonton, Simon de Chalons, and Nicolas Froment. The masterpiece of the school, however, is the anonymous “Avignon Pietà” (Louvre, Paris), painted before 1457 at Villeneuve-lès-Avignon and attributed by some to Charonton. This highly original work is an

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realschule German secondary school Britannica

Details: realschule, German secondary school with an emphasis on the practical that evolved in the mid-18th century as a six-year alternative to the nine-year gymnasium. It was distinguished by its practical curriculum (natural science and chemistry) and use of chemistry laboratories and workshops for wood

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School of Mind Chinese philosophy Britannica

Details: Other articles where School of Mind is discussed: Confucianism: The Song masters: …and implicitly rejecting Cheng Hao’s School of Mind, developed a method of interpreting and transmitting the Confucian Way that for centuries defined Confucianism not only for the Chinese but for the Koreans and Japanese as well. If, as quite a few scholars have advocated, Confucianism represents a distinct

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Rugby School school, Rugby, England, United Kingdom

Details: Rugby School, a famous public (i.e., fee-paying) school, was founded for boys in 1567 by Laurence Sheriff, a local resident, and was endowed with sundry estates, including Sheriff’s own house. The school flourished under the headship of Thomas Arnold between 1828 and 1842 and became,… Read More; history of rugby

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Bauhaus Definition, Style, Artists, Architecture, Art

Details: Bauhaus, school of design, architecture, and applied arts that existed in Germany from 1919 to 1933. It was founded by architect Walter Gropius, and notable members included Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, Marcel Breuer, and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. Learn more about the Bauhaus’s history and influence.

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Kogaku religious school, Japan Britannica

Details: school of “ancient learning” (kogaku). Such thinkers as Itō Jinsai (1627–1705) and Ōgyū Sorai (1666–1728) believed that the theories of metaphysical principle and vital force deviated too far from the thought of Confucius, who was primarily concerned with the education of humane scholars and officials who would promote good…

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lycée education Britannica

Details: lycée, in France, an upper-level secondary school preparing pupils for the baccalauréat (the degree required for university admission). The first lycée was established in 1801, under the educational reforms of Napoleon Bonaparte. Lycées formerly enrolled the nation’s most talented students in a

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Lyceum Greek philosophical school Britannica

Details: Lyceum, Athenian school founded by Aristotle in 335 bc in a grove sacred to Apollo Lyceius. Owing to his habit of walking about the grove while lecturing his students, the school and its students acquired the label of Peripatetics (Greek peri, “around,” and patein, “to walk”). The peripatos was the covered walkway of the Lyceum. Most of Aristotle’s extant writings comprise notes for

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Western State Normal School school, Farmington, Maine

Details: Other articles where Western State Normal School is discussed: University of Maine: …when it was opened as Western State Normal School in 1864. Notable graduates of this school include the twin brothers Francis Edgar Stanley and Freelan O. Stanley, manufacturers of steam-powered cars, and John Frank Stevens, a chief engineer of the Panama Canal.

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Merchant Taylors' School school, London, United Kingdom

Details: The school was founded (1561) by the Merchant Taylors’ Company of London, an incorporated group of craftsmen tailors. It was located at Suffolk Lane until 1875, when it was moved to Charterhouse Square. Richard Mulcaster was the first headmaster, and one of his pupils was Edmund Spenser. The school’s library (1662) is known for its

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Hauptschule German education Britannica

Details: Hauptschule, (German: “head school”), in Germany, five-year upper elementary school preparing students for vocational school, apprenticeship in trade, or the lower levels of public service. First introduced in West Germany in 1950, and enrolling 65 to 70 percent of the student population, the Hauptschule was one of three basic kinds of West German secondary school, complementing the

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database Definition, Types, & Facts Britannica

Details: Database, any collection of data, or information, that is specially organized for rapid search and retrieval by a computer. Databases are structured to facilitate the storage, retrieval, modification, and deletion of data in conjunction with various data-processing operations.

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cultural anthropology

Details: cultural anthropology - cultural anthropology - Boas and the culture history school: Cultural anthropology was also diversifying its concepts and its areas of research without losing its unity. Franz Boas, a German-born American, for example, was one of the first to scorn the evolutionist’s search for selected facts to grace abstract evolutionary theories; he inspired a number of students

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secondary education Britannica

Details: secondary education, the second stage traditionally found in formal education, beginning about age 11 to 13 and ending usually at age 15 to 18.The dichotomy between elementary education and secondary education has gradually become less marked, not only in curricula but also in organization. The proliferation of middle schools, junior schools, junior high schools, and other divisions has

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Greek literature

Details: Greek literature - Greek literature - Heptanesian School: Meanwhile more interesting developments had been taking place in the Ionian Islands (Heptanesos). During the 1820s two poets from the island of Zacynthus made their name with patriotic poems celebrating the War of Independence. One of these, Andréas Kálvos, who composed his odes in neoclassical form and archaic language, never wrote

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teaching Definition, History, & Facts Britannica

Details: Teaching, the profession of those who give instruction, especially in an elementary school or a secondary school or in a university. Measured in terms of its members, teaching is the world’s largest profession, with about 80 million teachers throughout the world. Learn more about teaching in this article.

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Sigmund Freud Biography, Theories, Psychology, Books

Details: After graduating (1873) from secondary school in Vienna, Sigmund Freud entered the medical school of the University of Vienna, concentrating on physiology and neurology; he obtained a medical degree in 1881. He trained (1882–85) as a clinical assistant at the General Hospital in Vienna and studied (1885–86) in Paris under neurologist Jean

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busing Definition, History, & Facts Britannica

Details: Busing, in the United States, the controversial practice in the later 20th century of transporting students to schools within or outside their local school districts as a means of rectifying racial segregation. Read here to learn more about busing in the United States.

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LeBron James Biography & Facts Britannica

Details: James was the consensus national high-school player of the year in his senior season, and he was selected by the Cleveland Cavaliers with the first overall selection of the 2003 NBA draft. Additionally, he signed an unprecedented $90 million endorsement contract with the Nike shoe company before he ever played a professional game.

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Hypatia Death, Facts, & Biography Britannica

Details: Hypatia, mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher who lived in a very turbulent era in Alexandria’s history. She is the earliest female mathematician of whose life and work reasonably detailed knowledge exists. She became the victim of a particularly brutal murder at the hands of a gang of Christian zealots.

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hankō Japanese school Britannica

Details: Other articles where hankō is discussed: education: Education in the Tokugawa era: …following the same policy, built hankō, or domain schools, in their castle towns for the education of their own retainers.

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